Well, you may not find any where else since today, we share CG Adventure – Full course with all tutorial videos and related files. Free download.

The developer no longer updates more tutorials, the course is fully completed.

Download CG Adventure

We keep the course’s original structure. All Lessons are classified into Concept Art, Modeling, and Animation sections.

I, Concept Art

0, Introductory Lesson (7:08)

Introductory Lesson About this lessonHome assignment Motion .mp4   (download)

In this introductory lesson, you’ll learn who a concept artist is. We’ll find out how the job of a concept artist is different from the job of an illustrator and of a traditional artist. We’ll focus on the importance of idea-generating and artistic skills in work, as well as have a look at the techniques used to create concept art. Moreover, you’ll learn the stages of work of a concept artist on a project on the examples from our animated short.

Click here for more details

1, Lesson 1 (36:50)

+ Lesson 1 – Video 1
+ Lesson 1 – Video 2
+ Lesson 1 – Video 3
Lecture_01_part_03.psd   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In the first lesson, we’ll get familiar with:

  • the concept of visual language, i.e. how one can depict something;
  • what visual language consists of: line; silhouette; texture/drawing on an object; light on an object;
  • what every object, entity in the world composed of, that is simple forms;
  • the meaning of “silhouette drawing” and how important and useful this approach in design is.

We’ll have a look at the Photoshop interface and its tools, interface settings, and standard brushes.

You’ll get your first assignment, as a concept artist on a project gets.

We’ll analyze the task, ideas, and references. Discover why it is so important to find references and start not with a picture but with an idea.

We’ll take another look at the process of working on a concept to better understand what we are going to do in the lessons to follow.

In the practical part, we’ll start working on a concept and:
  • cover an example of the first stage of drawing/sketching, namely line;
  • cover the basic and most important design principles – large-medium-small;
  • analyze real examples of design and how to turn something existing into futuristic;
  • analyze why one design is better than another on some examples;
  • draw 5 houses using which we’ll build a city later;
  • cover the basic principle of composition – 70/30 – or how to avoid uniformity;
  • build a city with the houses and make a picture for presentation to an art director or film director;
  • get to know how to add fog and what post effects will make the line concept more pleasant and presentable.
Click here to see Interface features and Shortcuts

Сhange interface — Upper panel: Window>Workspace>Painting;

Return to the standard painting interface —  Upper pane: Window>Workspace>Reset painting;

Add the Color panel — Upper panel: Window>Color;

Create a new file — Ctrl + N;

Select the Brush tool — B;

Brush settings — right-click or its analogue on a tablet pen;

Draw straight lines — Shift + draw a line with a pen/mouse;

Create a new layer — Ctrl + Shift + N;

Fill/Gradient — G;

Rectangular Marquee tool — M;

Move Tool — V or hold Ctrl + click and drag;

Copy and paste everything on a layer — Ctrl + C>Ctrl + V;

Copy and paste everything in sight — Ctrl + Shift + C>Ctrl + Shift + V;

Merge layer with the one below — Ctrl + E;

Transformation — Ctrl + T;

Change a layer’s tone — Ctrl + L.

Click here to see Home assignment

You’ll need to create a concept of a futuristic city.

Stage 1 — Analysis, references, and ideas.

Stage 2 — Using an example of an existing house, make a futuristic one applying the ideas from Stage 1.

Create 7 buildings using the ideas from Stage 1: 3 small, 3 medium, and 1 large. The large house will be the main element of the composition.

Arrange the buildings avoiding repetition in distances and sizes, making the main building stand out.

Complete the work by adding atmosphere and post effects.

2, Lesson 2 (30:01)

+ Lesson 2 About this lessonShortcuts Motion Design School.mp4   (download)
+ Lecture_2_PSD.psd   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In the second lesson, we will move on to the next stage of a concept artist’s working process,  tonal sketching. However, we won’t start working on the final tonal sketch right away. First, we will consider the whole process on a simpler example in order to create a cool complex concept in future. To create something complex, you need to begin with simple things.

We will have a look at references, learn how to analyze them and how to divide them into components.

  • analyzing design objects
  • analyzing how everything must look in our work
  • adding the atmosphere, tone, and lighting

We will create a simplified version of a tonal sketch so that you’ll figure out how to apply everything that we have understood when analyzing references.

You will learn additional tools and methods for applying layers that will come in handy at this stage.

Click here to see Interface features and Shortcuts

Adjust layer tone — Ctrl + L

Use a lower layer as a mask (clipping mask) — hold down Alt and right-click between the layers.

Click here to see Home assignment

Your task will be to create a simplified version of a tonal sketch. You’ll need to do the following:

  • Analyze references in order to understand how a tone, light, and atmosphere affect a photo
  • Take the three buildings that you’ve designed in the previous lesson
  • Apply all the principles that we’ve understood from references in order to create a great tonal sketch
  • Constantly compare your work with photos so that you understand why it doesn’t look good enough and how you can improve the final illustration.

3, Lesson 3 (32:09)

+ Lesson 3 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)
+ Lecture_03_Tone_Sketch_of_the_City.psd   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In the third lesson, we’ll draw a whole futuristic night city.

We have learned a lot in the second lesson, and now we’ll try to apply the knowledge on a more complex concept. We’ll revise some important aspects from the second lesson: reference analysis and ways to make the image seem realistic. Next, we’ll gradually create the final tonal sketch of high complexity. We’ll once again cover the tools and methods of working with layers we have already applied on a simple example.

Click here to see Shortcuts

Change a tone of the layer — Ctrl + L.

Use the bottom layer as a mask (clipping mask) — hold down Alt and click between the layers.

Warp Tool — Ctrl + T and Right-click, in the context menu — Warp Tool.

Click here to see Home assignment

You’ll need to create a tonal sketch of the whole futuristic city.

  • Analyze the references to understand how the tone, light, and atmosphere work on photographs.
  • Group the houses that are approximately at the same distance to work with tones more conveniently.
  • Apply all the principles we have distilled from the references to achieve a good tonal drawing.
  • Constantly compare your results with the photos to better understand why they don’t look good enough and how to improve the final picture.

4, Lesson 4 (23:59)

+ Lesson 4 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In the fourth lesson, I’ll introduce you to photobashing.

I’ll explain why the industry artists resort to it as well as show you several examples of how to use photos and photo textures.

We’ll learn how to blend photos into our works, following the value/color/saturation principle.

I’ll tell you where to search for quality photos and what tools to use to implement them in your work.

Click here to see Shortcuts

Magic Wand tool / Quick Selection tool — W (Shift + W)

Lasso tool / Polygonal Lasso tool L (Shift + L)

Color-Hue-Saturation — Ctrl + U

Levels — Ctrl + L

Color Balance — Ctrl + B

Click here to see Home assignment

Your task will be  to create a concept of a futuristic city.

Step 1 — Try to fit the mountain from the attached file, placing it at different distances and following the value/color/saturation principle.

Step 2 — Find photos of a night city and prepare a file with cut out textures. Play around with the tools we have covered in the lesson.

These tasks will help you in the next lesson that we will dedicate to photobashing. We will use the design of the buildings as an example.

The file for Step 1 of the home assignment:

Lesson_4_Mountain_Photobash.psd

Ready-made textures of the buildings and smoke:

Textures_Buildings_01.psd

Textures_Smokes_explosions_01.psd

5, Lesson 5 (27:56)

Lesson 5 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In lesson 5, we will apply all the knowledge gained in lesson 4. We will not only apply what we’ve learnt on a pre-ready picture but will also create the first realistic concept using photographs.

With the help of photographs of buildings, the night sky and a night city, we will create our own version based on the designs created in the previous lessons.

This is a pretty intensive lesson, so be prepared to do a good job and don’t be discouraged if something doesn’t work out. In this case, better watch the lesson once again, or go back to the previous one.

It is especially important not to forget to compare your artwork with the reference photographs you have chosen for yourself.

Click here to see Shortcuts

Change layer tone — Ctrl + L

Use the bottom layer as a mask (clipping mask) — Click on the top layer -> Alt + click on the bottom layer which will be the mask

Warp Tool  — Ctrl + T -> Right-click and choose Warp Tool in the context menu.

Click here to see Home assignment

Your task will be:

  • to create the final concept based on the sketch you’ve created in the second lesson using photographs;
  • to add final adjustments, just like at the end of each video and post your homework in the group.

Lesson_5_HW_Example.psd   (download)

6, Lesson 6 (28:28)

Lesson 6 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In this lesson, you’ll learn your way around the tool that no concept artists can do without. And I mean 3D.

I’ll teach you how and where 3D is used. I’ll also show you how to use 3D most effectively. You’ll get familiar with Blender. We’ll turn one of our designs into 3D. This knowledge will come in handy in the following lessons in which we’ll be using 3D for sketching and creation of the final concept.

Since this is not a 3D course, do not forget that you can enhance your knowledge by watching a free video series on the official Blender YouTube channel.

Blender Fundamentals 2.8

Click here to see Shortcuts

T — Toggle Toolbar

N — Toggle Sidebar

Tab — Edit-mode toggle

Shift + A — add object to the scene

Ctrl + C — to copy a selected object / a selected area of an object

Ctrl + V — to paste a selected object / a selected area of an object

Click here to see Home assignment
  • to download the latest official version of Blender;
  • to create at least one building based on your concept;
  • to find out more about Blender Fundamentals 2.8

A scene of the building model from the lesson: Modeling_Demo_Lesson_6.blend

7, Lesson 7 (29:33)

Lesson 7 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

Lesson 7 will be quite informative. We will have a look at really important compositional rules and principles as well as try to find a few compositions on the basis of our concepts. You will learn what composition is and how to control the viewer’s eyes. We will cover such compositional notions as:

  • contrast,
  • focal points,
  • hierarchy of elements in a picture.

Moreover, we will figure out how to add depth to a picture.

In the second part of the lesson, we will try to apply these rules while setting key frames in a 3D program.

Click here to see Shortcuts

(Num Lock) 0 — switch from the viewport to the camera view;

Ctrl + Alt + (Num Lock) 0 — set the user’s view as the camera view.

Click here to see Home assignment
  • Analyze compositional principles in the works of other artists like in the lesson’s example
  • Design a few compositions for key frames on the basis of concepts.
  • Set at least 2 or, preferably, 4 key frames in 3D. Don’t go into details to avoid wasting time on it.

Using these angles of view, we will draw the sketches of key frames in the next lesson.

3d_Keyframes.zip   (download)

8, Lesson 8 (30:52)

+ Lesson 8 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)
+ files_lesson_8.zip   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In this lesson, we will focus on overpainting the 3D draft that we’ve prepared in the previous lesson. You’ll learn to work with a 3D draft, and you’ll figure out how to use it in order to make a drawing better and more correct. I’ll also demonstrate to you some interesting tricks which make working on perspective easier.

Click here to see Home assignment

Take your renders as a basis. You can take the ones you’ve done in the previous lesson, or one of my renders, which I’ve shown you in the video.

Complete all the stages I’ve demonstrated to you in my example in order to create a final sketch over a 3D draft. Make at least one variant of sketch or, preferably, 2 or more.

9, Lesson 9 (30:52)

+ Lesson 9 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)
+ Lecture_09_Concept.psd   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

In lesson 9 we will focus on creating keyframes.

We’ll cover the whole process of working on keyframes from an idea to a final keyframe. You’ll discover a simple but effective approach that I use when working in the studio. I’ll demonstrate to you how to easily make dynamic compositional sketches and how not to lose the dynamics both in 3D and in final work. I’ll share with you a couple of tricks on how you can cheat and how to use photos creatively.

Click here to see Home assignment

Take one or all the three keyframes from the brief and create a final illustration by completing all the stages I’ve demonstrated to you in the lesson.

If you feel like you aren’t ready for this yet, take the sketch from the previous lesson and complete all the stages of photobashing and drawing in order to get a final work.

II, Modeling

  • Lesson 1

Lesson 1 Motion Design School – modeling.mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about

Welcome to the module dedicated to modeling. This very stage is what follows concept art. Modeling isn’t the simplest area of the CG industry and it has its own pipeline and lots of techniques and styles. In this part, we will mostly focus on Hard Surface Modelling since it is the easiest thing to start with. You will feel more comfortable getting used to the workflow of a modeler and mastering the major principles of working with polygons. In this lesson, we will work with Autodesk Maya. Of course, we will start with taking a look at the program itself.

We will get familiar with navigation, tools one needs to start modeling in Маya, and tools to manipulate polygons and work with them.

Click here to see Home assignment

Alright, it’s time to practice on your own. Model your own unique Lego objects and a scene:

Task#1

Create a building made of Lego blocks.

Task#2

Create a vehicle made of Lego blocks.

Task#3

Model a few more Lego vehicles and buildings and combine them into one city scene.

Homework.zip   (download)

  • Lesson 2

Lesson 2 Motion Design School – – modeling.mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about
Having covered Maya navigation and how Modeling Toolkit works, in this lesson, we will take a closer look at the tools, how to use them, and how to work with them. We will start creating such details as screw-nuts and screws for our longboard using primitives.
Click here to see Shortcuts

Extrude — select a face and press Ctrl+E;

Bevel — select an edge and press Ctrl+B;

If you select an object and right-click holding down Shift, a marking menu will pop up. Select Multi-Cut to place edges and edge loops.

Click here to see Home assignment
Your homework will be to try to make a screw and a screw-nut as in the lesson. For those who want more practice, try to make a clamp for a spindle (the photo is attached).

_homework.zip   (download)

  • Lesson 3

Lesson 3 Motion Design School – modeling..mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about
In the previous lesson, we have looked at modeling tools. Now it is time to review this knowledge and expand our workflow on a more complex example! In this lesson, we will create a complete longboard model. Also, we will learn hardsurface modeling in a nutshell!

Here you can find the list of main Maya hotkeys.

Click here to see Home assignment

Basic: Your home assignment is to create a longboard like in the lesson.

Advanced: After you have learned all the necessary modeling tools on the example of the longboard, try to design roller skates. They have some elements that are the same but they also have also a lot of new shapes. Assemble your own reference list and try to make them unique.

Home Assignment.zip   (download)

  • The main Maya hotkeys
Click here to see Maya one-key shortcuts
Click here to see Hotbox Display hotkeys
Space (When pressed down) — Show the hotbox
Click here to see Tool Operations hotkeys

Return — Complete current tool

— Decrease manipulator size

Insert — Enter tool Edit mode

=, + — Increase manipulator size

W — Move Tool, or with left mouse button for Move Tool marking menu

J — Move, Rotate, Scale Tool Snapping (press and release)

E — Rotate Tool, or with left mouse button for Rotate Tool marking menu

R — Scale Tool, or with left mouse button for Scale Tool marking menu

Shift + Q — Select Tool, or with left mouse button for Component marking menu

Alt + Q — Select Tool, or with left mouse button for Polygon marking menu

Q — Select Tool, or with left mouse button for Selection Mask marking menu

Y — Selects the last used tool that is not one of Select, Move, Rotate, or Scale

T — Show manipulator tool

Ctrl + T — Show universal manipulator tool

Insert — Switches between move pivot and move object (Move Tool)

D — With left mouse button move pivot (Move Tool)

Click here to see Selecting Objects and Components hotkeys

F10 — Edge

F11 — Face

> — Grow polygon selection region

F8 — Object/Component (Switch between object and component editing)

Ctrl + I — Select next intermediate object

< — Shrink polygon selection region

F12 — UV

F9 — Vertex

Alt + F9 — Vertex Face

Click here to see Snapping

x — Snap to grid intersections

c — Snap to curves

v — Snap to CV, vertex, pivot

Click here to see Multicut Tool hotkeys

When no cut or slice points have been placed:

Ctrl + click — Insert an edge loop

Ctrl + Middle-click — Insert a centered edge loop

Ctrl + Shift + click — Insert an edge loop that snaps to increments of the Snap Step %

When cut points have been placed:

Shift + click an edge — snap to increments of the Snap Step %

Shift + drag over an edge — set the Snap Step % interactively

Backspace — Remove cut/slice points

Backspace/Delete — Delete highlighted edges

Z/Shift + Z — Undo/redo any action

Drag — Reposition cut/slice points

Middle-drag a slice plane — Reposition a slice plane

Middle-drag anywhere on the mesh — Quick slice a mesh

Right-click — Complete a cut or slice

Esc — Cancel a cut or slice operation

Enter — Commit cut

y — Reactivate the Multi-Cut Tool.

  • Lesson 4

Lesson 4 Motion Design School -modeling.mp4   (download)

Click here to see what is this lesson about
In this lesson, we`ll be unwrapping our model to prepare it for the next step, that is texturing it in Substance Painter.  We`ll learn how to map models and unwrap them in UV Editor.
Click here to see Hotkeys

4 — Wireframe mode

5 — Shaded mode.

6 — Display texture image

7 — Toggle UV Distortion display.

Ctrl + Shift + A — Select all active components

Ctrl + Shift + I — Invert current selection

Ctrl + < or > — Shrink or grow the selection

Ctrl + C — Copies last selected face

Ctrl + V — Pastes the last face added to the clipboard

Ctrl + L — Lay out the current selection.

Ctrl + U — Unfold the current selection.

Ctrl + Shift + X — Create a UV Shell from the current selection

Ctrl + Shift (Drag) — When a transform tool is active, this constrains movement to edges.

Shift + X — Cut currently selected edges.

Shift + S — Sew currently selected edges.

Q, W, E, R — Activate Select, Translate, Rotate, or Scale Tool respectively

A — Frame all UV shells for the selected object.

F — Frame all selected components/shells.

Ctrl + Up, Down — Increase / Decrease resolution of checker map (when Checker Map is enabled).

Click here to see Home assignment
  • Unwrap your model using all tools described in this lesson
  • Unwrap your unique model that you created in the previous lesson.
  • Lesson 5

Lesson 5 Motion Design School- modeling.mp4   (download)

Click here to see Lesson about
Let’s dive into texturing with Substance Painter, one of the most powerful texturing tools that has become an industry standard. In this lesson, we’ll cover all the basics that you need to know to color your model using the existing material library of Substance Painter.
Click here to see Hotkeys

Undo — CTRL + Z

Redo — CTRL + Y

Open Project — CTRL + O

Close Project — CTRL + F4

Save Project — CTRL + S

Save Project as New Project — CTRL + N

Import particles in project — CTRL + ALT + R

Increase tool size — ]

Decrease tool size — [

Pick stroke material — P

Symmetry — L

Lazy Mouse — D

Display next channel — C

Display material — M

Toggle animation — Space

Export all channels — CTRL + SHIFT + E

Show entire mesh — F

Toggle quick mask edition — T

Clear quick mask — Y

Invert Mask — I

Viewers layout: 3D/2D — F1

Viewers layout: 3D only — F2

Viewers layout: 2D only — F3

Select Paint tool — 1

Select Physical paint tool — CTRL + 1

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1: Color the longboard model using Substance Painter.

Level 2: Color your own model you’ve created in the previous assignment (rollers or other model).

  • Cyber dog home assignment #2 Texturing

At this point, we would like you to proceed with your Cyber Dog home assignment.

Click here too read more

Level 1.  You can use our model as a base mesh for texturing. Its already unwrapped and prepared for texturing. Create textures for it using Substance Painter and the information from Lesson 5.

Level 2.  Use your own model of a cyber dog that you created in the previous home assignment, unwrap it and start the texturing process in Substance Painter applying the information you’ve learned in Lesson 5.

You can use one of our concepts as a reference:

+ Dog001.zip   (download)
+ Cyber dog home assignment #2 Texturing_textures.zip   (download)

In the next Cyber Dog assignment, you`ll be working on post-production and final render using Substance Designer and information from Lesson 6!

  • Lesson 6

Lesson 6 Motion Design School – modeling.mp4   (download)

In this lesson we’ll finish texturing the longboard model and will make the basic final presentation.

Click here to see Hotkeys

Ctrl + Alt + right click — to switch between objects

Shift + right mouse button — rotate the Environment light

Click here to see Home assignment
  1. Using the model of the longboard from the lesson, add a different texture to it to your liking.
  2. If you are ready for a more challenging task, choose a more complex model, for example, the Cyber Dog from your previous home assignment or any other one you like and texture it.
  • Lesson 7

Lesson 7 Motion Design School – modeling.mp4   (download)

Click here to see Lesson about

This is an introductory lesson to the section dedicated to robot-like characters in 3D.

In this lesson, we will take a look at basic principles of creating concepts from scratch. You will learn what ideas consist of and how these ideas turn into a good material for work. Moreover, we will even try to draw something ourselves.

During the lesson, we will be using various drawing software such as Autodesk SketchBook and Adobe Photoshop. However, you can use any 2D editor you like since all the methods and techniques demonstrated in the lesson are universal for all 2D editors.

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1: Follow the technique and create a couple of concepts. Your aim is to try this approach for illustrating your own ideas.

Level 2: If you have decided to take the most challenging path, you should first design your own robot. Start with searching for references and ready-made examples, but try to find simple examples. Create such a concept that will help you in your work, will be a base for your design, and will serve you as a guide. In this type of works, it is more important to make a graphically clear scheme than to draw a beautiful picture. You can use any drawing techniques that you find convenient. Even a piece of paper and a usual pencil can help you with that. Good luck!

  • Lesson 8

Lesson 8 Motion Design School – modeling.mp4   (download)

In this lesson, we’ll start creating the Octopus model. We will create basic shapes and compose the geometry for further detailing.

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1

Create the head geometry and attach the legs to it.

Level 2 

Create a basic geometry of the octopus following the examples from the lesson.

Level 3

If you have your own concept of a robot, create its geometry following it and using tips from the lesson. If you have chosen this difficulty spontaneously and don’t have a concept of your robot, think about how you can complicate, enhance, or change the concept or the robot from this part of the lesson.

  • Lesson 9

Lesson 9 Motion Design School – modeling.mp4   (download)

Click here to see Lesson about
This lesson is our first step into advanced modelling. We’ll start adding basic geometry for our octopus character model. We`ll be using the Maya Modelling toolkit, instances, custom pivots and much more.
Click here to see shortcuts

Ctrl + Tab — Multi-component selection mode

F9 — Vertex selection mode

F10 — Edge selection mode

F11 — Face selection mode

Switch component modes — Ctrl + click a selection mode icon (vertex, edge, face).

` — Tweak mode

B — Soft selection mode

D — Custom pivot editing mode

X — Snap to grid intersections

C — Snap to curves

V — Snap to CV, vertex, pivot

Click an edge — Insert an edge loop

Shift + click a component — Insert connecting edges between components

Ctrl + click a component — Remove components from selection

Drag — Merge components

Middle-drag — Merge components to center

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1. Сreate the octopus model following the lesson step by step.

Level 2. Continue adding details to your work. Create a base mesh for your unique character, that is based on your own concept, references or imagination.

  • Lesson 10

+ Lesson 10 – Motion Design School.mp4   (download)
+ _project files.zip   (download)

Click here to see Lesson about

This is the final modeling lesson in which we’ll finalize a part of the robot’s mechanical arm and try basic techniques of the procedural cloning with the MASH system. You’ll also learn what KitBash is in 3D and how it facilitates the modeling process.

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1

Using MASH, create the robot’s crest. Adjust the shape with the Lattice deformer.

Level 2 

Modify the geometry fragment specified in the file. Using MASH, create the robot’s crest. Adjust the shape with the Lattice deformer.

Level 3

Try to finalize your own robot, using the techniques from the lesson. You can use KitBash or ready-made parts of your geometry. Think about how else you can implement MASH in your project.

  • Lesson 11

+ Lesson 11 – Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

+ 11_ project files.zip   (download)

In this lesson, you’ll learn about interesting features of the UV tool kit. We’ll tell you how to quickly and comprehensively do the UV mapping of complex objects that consist of many parts. You’ll learn what UDIMs are and how to pack objects on UV tiles.

Home assignment

Level 1. Map the specified objects and pack the result on 2 UV tiles.

+ l01.zip

Level 2. Map the specified objects and pack the result on 2 UV tiles.

+ l02.zip

Level 3. Map your own character using the techniques shown in the lesson.

  • Lesson 12

+ Lesson 12 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)
+ 12_project files.zip (2Gb)   (download)

Click here to see this Lesson is about
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to prepare a complex model for texturing, create all the necessary maps, and get rid of artifacts before baking. We’ll discover how the PBR shader works and analyze how to work with this shader in Substance Painter. In the course of the lesson, we’ll go through all the main steps of creating a complex shader for our robot. You’ll learn how to work with instance shaders, create quick shading based on ready-made shaders, and create your own shaders.

The Substance Painter interface has been changed during the lesson: the panel with materials has been moved to the side to ensure a more comfortable work with a vertically stretched object. I hope this change won’t bother you.

A few words about the PBR

Many different models to process surface shading have been tested and implemented throughout the 3D graphics history. As of today, the PBR is recognized as the most versatile and easiest to adjust.

Its essence is that its authors tried to describe all the basic properties with the least number of parameters.

Color.  Describes the base color of a surface as for all surface types. Instead of it, you can use a procedurally generated texture or a texture created based on photo material.

Metalness. This parameter is responsible for the nature of surface reflection. Any material in our world reflects light to some extent. The reflection coefficient (intensity) changes depending on the type of material. And in order not to dive deep into the physics of the process, it is important to differentiate. With a Metalness value of 0, we’ll describe surface properties called “dielectric,” that is, non-conductive materials. Such materials have low reflectivity in the physical world. Plastic, wood, rubber, glass, ceramics, etc., are all in this list. On the other hand, the “conductor” type surface, conducts electricity, will have Metalness equal to 1. The group includes all the metals. Of course, everything is much more complicated in the real world and these simplifications are intended to facilitate the adjustment of the materials.

Roughness. Any object surface has micro roughs; even chrome and mirror surfaces have such micro roughs. Those are glossy or matte surfaces. If the surface is chrome (glossy), the light will be reflected at the same angle it hit the surface.

If the surface is matte, the light will be reflected at random angles. This doesn’t contradict the laws of physics. The thing is that these micro roughs affect the light reflection angles, and we see a very blurry reflection. You can’t simulate the process with Normal or Height maps, for this process isn’t simulated, but uses simplified formulas to describe how the angles at which light is reflected vary.

Normal.  With the normal map, you can describe the pseudo-roughness of a surface, create dents, cleavage faces, create the effect of relief paper or wrought iron. Working with normal maps is considered to be one of the modeling techniques. In fact, the normal map defines the angular deviation of the surface normal. This map consists of three channels, and each channel keeps the information about the angular deviation along each coordinate axis.

Height. With the height map, you can describe the pseudo roughness of a surface. Contrary to the Normal map, it calculates the height from black-and-white maps, which simplifies shader adjustment.

A combination of Height and Normal maps is often used to create shaders.

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1. Following the tips from the lesson, create a texture in Substance Painter.

Level 2. Create a texture for your unique robot following the principles covered in the lesson.

  • Lesson 13
Lesson 13 Motion Design School.mp4   (download)
147.32 MB

+ 13_project files.zip

Click here to see What is this Lesson about

This is the final lesson about characters. We’ll gather all our stages in one scene, create a shader for our character based on prepared textures, and set a speaking pose for it, using the prepared rig. We’ll analyze the camera settings and create some expressive angles. We’ll make light for the scene and analyze how to use different types of lights to create mood and ambiance of the image.

HDRI (High Dynamic Range Imaging) – is a panoramic photo that covers all angles of view from one point and contains a large amount of data (usually 32 bits per pixel per channel) that can be used to illuminate a CG scene.

JPG is on the left, HDRi is on the right.

IES – This file is a digital representation of a real light source. The key word here is “real,” for IES files are created based on calculations made by professional equipment for lamp producers. You can often find and download IES files from their sites. Real, physically correct light for a real lamp in our interior, what could be better? Let’s figure out how it works.

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1. Based on the initial scene, create a material and connect necessary textures to it. Create a camera and pick the right angle for it. Create aiSkydome light and adjust it, using HDRi, according to your liking. Render the image.

Level 2. Based on the initial scene, create a material and connect necessary textures to it.  Set a speaking pose for the object. Create a camera and pick the right angle for it. Create light following the techniques shown in the lesson. Render the image.

Level 3. Based on the attached files for the lighting, try to create your own interesting light setup. I recommend you take a look at the schemes photographers and cameramen use and study this topic in more detail. Adjust all the necessary materials and cameras following the techniques shown in the lesson. Render the image.

+ _homework & materials.zip

Lesson 14 will be uploaded once it is available.

III, Animation

  • Lesson 1 (07, July 2020 update)

Animation – Lesson 1 – Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see The Lesson about

This is the first animation lesson in which you’ll learn how to work with a character rig and will understand how transformations work. Also, we will create first poses using the character from our animated short FATA. Keep in mind that great poses are key to a great animation!

Click here to see Navigation Shortcuts

The navigation commands are central to virtually everything you do in Maya. Don’t let yourself fall into the trap of thinking that if something looks good from the front or side, it’ll look good from every angle. You should be continually orbiting around your model and viewing it from every possible perspective.

Alt + RMB + Drag – Rotate camera (tumble).

Alt + LMB + Drag (or Scroll Wheel) – Zoom in/out. This doesn’t actually “zoom” the camera lens, but instead moves the camera forward or backward in space (like a dolly).

Alt + MMB + Drag ­– Track (Move the camera up, down, left, or right).

Spacebar – Press the Tap spacebar to switch between four-panel and single-panel layouts.

Click here to see Manipulators

After the navigation controls, the manipulator shortcuts are almost like “home-row” for a modeler. QWE, and R let you switch between the selection, translate, scale, and rotate tools quickly and efficiently.

Q – Selection Tool

W – Translate (Move)

E – Rotate

R – Scale

Click here to see Viewport Command Shortcuts:

Most of Maya’s viewport options can be accessed from the number keys. Numerals 1-3 control object smoothing, while 4-7 control Maya’s display modes:

Sub-D Preview / Smoothing:

1 – Polygon cage (smoothing off)

2 – Polygon cage + Subdivision Preview

3 – Subdivision Preview (smoothing on)

Display Modes:

4 – Wireframe

5 – Shaded

6 – Texture Preview

7 – Lighting Preview

Click here to see Miscellaneous Maya Shortcuts:

And finally, here’s a selection of miscellaneous tools you should get to know as soon as possible:

F – Frame object. It zooms in on an object so that it fills the viewport panel.

G – Repeat a command. It’s tough to describe just how handy this can be to someone who hasn’t done a whole lot of modeling, but this will be useful time and time again.

X – Snapping. Holding down X while using the move, scale, or rotate tools will enable grid snapping.

Ctrl + Z – Undo. Obviously, this is enormously useful. Maya’s default memory allocation for the Undo function is limited to 50. This might sound like a lot of undoing, but we strongly recommend going into Settings/Preferences and setting the undo steps to something larger (like 100, 200, or even infinite.)

Ctrl + G – Group objects.

Ctrl + D – Duplicate

Shift + Ctrl + DDuplicate special.

Ctrl + A – Open attribute editor.

( + or ) – Scale manipulator tool up or down. Making your object manipulator larger actually gives you a finer degree of control over Maya’s move, scale, and rotate tools. If you’re having trouble with a precise object movement, try scaling your manipulator.

Click here to see Home assignment
  1. Create a pose step by step following the lesson.
  2. Using your imagination, create poses that will represent different emotions: happiness, anger, fear, sadness.

+, Girl.zip   (download)

  • Lesson 2 (14, July 2020 update)

+, Animation – Lesson 2 – Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see the lesson about

This lesson is your next step into animation. You will learn how to create blocking for your animation. We’ll cover such tools as the Graph Editor and the Channel Box. You will learn how to set and adjust keyframes. What’s more, you’ll find out an easy approach to copying and editing poses in order to speed up your animation workflow!

Click here to see Shortcuts

S – Animate > Set key

I – Insert Keys tool (for graph editor)

Shft + S + LMB – Keyframe marking menu

Shft +  S + MMB – Tangent marking menu

Shft  + E – Set key for Rotate

Shift + R – Set key for Scale

Shft + W – Set key for Translate

Alt + S – Cycle handle sticky state (for IK handles)

Click here to see Home assignment
  • Level 1. By following the lesson, create blocking step by step.
  • Level 2. Create blocking for your own animation. Keep in mind that practice is the key to improve your skills! Try to shoot a reference video with yourself and recreate blocking from it!

+, Girl.zip   (download)

  • Lesson 3 (20, July 2020 update)

+, Animation – Lesson 3 – Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see Lesson 3 about

In this lesson, we will finalize the animation. We will go from blocking to spline and polishing the animation. We`ll cover new tools like Weighted Tangents, Retime Tools, and auto keys. We will also talk about body mechanics and overall animation workflow.

Click here to see Shortcuts

S – Animate > Set key

I – Insert Keys tool (for graph editor)

Shft + S + LMB – Keyframe marking menu

Shft +  S + MMB – Tangent marking menu

Shft  + E – Set key for Rotate

Shift + R – Set key for Scale

Shft + W – Set key for Translate

Alt + S – Cycle handle sticky state (for IK handles)

Click here to see Home assignment
  1. Finish the waving animation step by step following the tutorial.
  2. Finish your own animation that you`ve started in the previous lesson.
  • Lesson 4 (27, July 2020 update)

+, Animation – Lesson 4 – Motion Design School.mp4   (download)

Click here to see this Lesson about

In this lesson, we`ll cover some fundamental principles of animation. We`ll talk about timing, spacing, squash and stretch, arcs, and this knowledge will help you create complex animations while following a clear approach!

Click here to see Shortcuts

S – Animate > Set key

I – Insert Keys tool (for graph editor)

Shft + S + LMB – Keyframe marking menu

Shft +  S + MMB – Tangent marking menu

Shft  + E – Set key for Rotate

Shift + R – Set key for Scale

Shft + W – Set key for Translate

Alt + S – Cycle handle sticky state (for IK handles)

Click here to see Home assignment

Level 1. Create a ball animation following the lesson step-by-step.

Level 2. Create a different kind of ball animation using your own imagination.

+, ball_rig.mb.zip   (download)

  • Lesson 5 (03, August 2020 update)

In this lesson, we’ll start working on the walk cycle. We’ll take a look at the difference between male and female walks and animate the lower body.

+, Animation – Lesson 5 – Motion Design School.mp4  (Download)

Click here to see Shortcuts:

Alt + V – play/stop playing the animation

S – set a keyframe

Z – undo

* A walk is a series of controlled falls. This means that a body moves down (when one foot contacts the ground) and up (when a person moves forward).

* Male and female walks differ (in range of movements as well as in pelvis, hands, and chest movements)

* To create a walk successfully, you decide on the contact and the passing poses of the legs straight away. The contact pose is usually performed in the first frame, in the middle frame, and in the last frame, while the passing occurs between the frames mentioned above.

* Pay attention to how a foot behaves (a toe and a heel).

* Since a walk is a controlled fall, you need to take care of balance as well. So, we’ll have to animate tilts to the left and to the right.

* To emphasize the weight, we’ll animate how the pelvis moves along the X and Z axes.

Home assignment

Animate the lower body. And, if you want, pick some other character and animate its lower body.

 

Content source: https://motiondesign.school/products/cg-adventure

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Vorti

can’t dowload 9 lesson help plssss

Vorti

 
if I buy a subscription for $ 15, can you expect a course update?

Vorti

 
only you did not answer my question. I once bought this course on the website https://gfxdrug.com/cg-adventure-motiondesign-school-download-free3/, but I did not receive the course like other users.

joba

where is MODULE #3 Character design???
and other modules????

joba

No tihs is not the full course
course

Where is the animation and rigging parts?

Joba

so it means that you dont have the full course

Vorti

relax the course is updated every Monday – Tuesday, so everything backward will also be, and these 100% are just a site bug

emmanuel

Hi The course I requested Is it possible to be posted? thanks

pygmy

Hello, thanks for the amazing uploads. I was wondering if you ever got a chance/the files, if you could upload “Frame-by-frame Handdrawn FX” by Motion Design School. Not to be found anywhere :’)

Hope you’re having a great day!

dramaqueen

it is available in Russian audio in various forums

pygmy

Thanks for the information dramaqueen, I’ll look around for it. I don’t speak Russian so that would be a huge hindrance ;(

theonewholovesyoumore

“Frame-by-frame Handdrawn FX I also want this course desperately

dramaqueen

search on various Russian forums you can find it but unless you can understand Russian it is useless *I downloaded it and deleted it as I cannot follow

rajdeep_wasekar

Send me the Russian forum.

rajdeep_wasekar

Why is the download very slow, even when I paid for the premium ?

oriox

Hey man im a premium user and cant download this : Lesson 5 (03, August 2020 update) (is just a text and the link is not in it apparently.